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Sustainability

UPS sets ambitious new alternative-fuel goal

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Sustainability Report also details UPS's reduction in greenhouse gas emissions in 2012.

While the newly released UPS Corporate Sustainability Report focuses primarily on the social, environmental and economic measures for 2012, it also establishes an ambitious new goal. By 2017, UPS expects to reach 1 billion miles driven by its alternative fuel/advanced technology vehicles – more than double the previous 400-million-mile goal.

Despite an increase in the number of packages delivered, greenhouse gas emissions decreased. 

 

In 2012, the total number of packages delivered by UPS increased to 4.1 billion, yet the company was able to reduce its total greenhouse gas emissions. Environmental achievements included ground and air fuel savings, increased investment in alternative fuel vehicles and retooled routes that shaved more than 12 million miles from ground deliveries.

The report's theme is "More of What Matters," and here are just a few of the highlights:

  • A Global Forestry Initiative to plant more than 1 million trees by the end of this year.
  • The UPS Foundation, along with UPS logistics experts, supported humanitarian relief efforts in 35 countries.
  • Total charitable contributions and United Way donations from UPS, the UPS Foundation and its employees, reached $97.5 million, an increase of $4 million from 2011.
  • 1.8 million volunteer hours donated by UPS employees, friends and family, a new record.
  • Rapid expansion of UPS's dedicated healthcare infrastructure to more than 6 million square feet on four continents.

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Reader Comments

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Jay
Natural gas is wave of future......get on board. We need to get off dirty imported OPEC oil and onto our cleaner, secure, domestically produced natural gas. In process keep those petro dollars right here at home instead of sending them to Mid East tyrants who hate our guts.
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Jimm
How is electricity an enviromentally friendly fuel? Always amazing when they say electric vechicles are enviromentally friendly. That power comes from somewhere else and the emissions are somewhere else. It is less fuel efficient than gasoline.
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C'villeBill
Some history: WSJ Letter to the Editor, Aug. 25, 2010 . . . Electric Trucks Delivered Silently And Well Long Ago "I enjoyed the article describing the efforts to create a battery-powered city delivery van ("FedEx Considers Electric Trucks," Corporate News, Aug. 12, 2010). Your discussion of the trucks brought back happy memories of my childhood in New York City in the late 1940s and '50s when we would look forward to the passing of the all-electric United Parcel Service trucks that plied the streets. We were fascinated by their smooth, silent and powerful acceleration. Occasionally, the driver would allow us to step into the cab and ride along to the next stop, usually just up the street. Why is there never any mention of the long ago widespread use of electric delivery vans? Why was that technology just allowed to die, and why are we just now "discovering" that all-electric city vans are a great innovation?" Dave Coriaty Indianapolis
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Anonymous
Has anyone read the first comment? Does the horrible grammar and misspelled words make anyone else think that this is the last person on earth who should make a comment about renewable algae fuel. Is it alga or algae? Lufthanser? You mean, Lufthansa? What the heck is an automosphere? Oh, you mean that ATMOSPHERE. Learn how to read and write - then post your stupid comments.
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Anonymous
What happened to the HYDRAULIC HYBRID UPS trucks? They were being used and showed to be fuel efficient and ecologically much safer than battery toting electric hybrids. Also, they used commonly available parts in a way to create this vehicle without any problems associated with experimental components which aren't really available or practical.
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Anonymous
Exactly. Ethanol, like other government mandated energy sources, benefits those who make the products and the politicians who get their donations in return for legislation favorable to the sources. Also, I would like to know how much of this savings is due to UPS contracting with the Postal Service to make home deliveries.
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Anonymous
The alternative fuel is CNG, they have been replacing the diesel package car fleet in the major cities for years.
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Anonymous
That's a stupid comment, you don't want corn based ethanol because it made some farmers rich! Does that mean you won't use cell phones because it might make Apple and it's investors rich? By the way do you know what the by-product from ethanol is?
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Anonymous
They are using Natural Gas, not Ethanol
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Anonymous
A better idea is algae fuel. research University of San Diego/ Scripps College and alga fuel and you will learn a ton. this fuel is used by Lufthanser Airlines and has no emissions and no refinery process. Plus when it enters the automosphere it cleans it. Alga is renewable and doesn't require use of valuable farm land. can be grown from toxic waste.
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Anonymous
I have seen quite a few natural gas vehicles.
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Anonymous
much reflection . thank you
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Anonymous
ethanol certainly is not an environmentally alternative fuel.
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Anonymous
I wish the story specified which "alternative" fuels they were using. Was it Natural Gas, or electricity, Ethanol, or ??? I hope it wasn't corn based ethanol, because that particular fuel has made corn farmers rich, BUT has drastically impacted the food aid supplies to poor countries.
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